Playlist Friday: Drinking songs

It’s another Friday! This calls for a celebration. Cheers!

“If You Don’t Start Drinkin’ (I’m Gonna Leave) ” – George Thorogood

George Thorogood’s problem is that he’s got too many good drinking songs. Oh, and also, he’s a really bad influence on his sober friends.

“Salt of the Earth” – The Rolling Stones

So you’ve succumbed to peer pressure and the evening’s first brew is in your hand – let’s toast to something worthwhile. Here’s to the hardworking people, the salt of the earth. The two (now seven) thousand million. Hopefully not to each one individually.

“Drinking Song” – Jason Webley

Your typical drinking song tends to sound like a sea chanty because the same rhythm that helps a bunch of people keep a cohesive pace while oaring also helps them keep a cohesive swaying and glass-thumping pace while boozing. I’m just guessing here.

Jason Webley, by the way, also collaborates with Amanda Palmer on Evelyn Evelyn – a conjoined twins act. Yeah. But I mostly like him because he sounds like Kevin Quain.

“Catch You in the Rye” – Kevin Quain

Who’s Kevin Quain, you ask? This guy. He kicks ass.

At this point in the evening, it’s time to dance.

“Jockey Full of Bourbon” – Tom Waits

Still dancing, but starting to trip up now.

“One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer” – John Lee Hooker

I like bourbon, so let’s stick with that. It’s last call anyway.

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Playlist Friday: Colouring songbook

Do try to colour outside the lines.

“They’re Red Hot” – Hugh Laurie

Did you know that Hugh Laurie released a blues album a couple of years ago? He often played piano and guitar on House, Fry & Laurie and Jeeves & Wooster, so he’s clearly been secretly planning this for years. I don’t love his singing voice, but the album is still well worth a listen. There’s also a charming and hilarious introductory essay by him in the liner notes on why it’s ok for a white middle-aged British dude to sing old black men’s music.

Something else that Hugh Laurie wrote, incidentally – and I recommend this without any reservations, because it’s brilliant and not the least bit a vanity project – is a novel called The Gun Seller. It’s a humorous thriller that reads like a Wodehousian parody of noir fiction and it’s very, very good.

Tangerine from MEssing Around by Molly JohnsonTangerine” – Molly Johnson

I chanced upon Molly Johnson performing at the Toronto Jazz Festival nearly ten years ago, and was captivated by her singing. She seems to have gained in popularity since then – winning a Juno and even recording a promotional clip for Ontario. Rumor has it though, that junk mail addressed to her still occasionally arrives at the Cameron Public House, where she used to room in her less-renowned days.

Yellow Submarine, the BeatlesYellow Submarine” – The Beatles

Since we’re rumor-mongering – I heard that these guys have something of a cult following? They’re not my cup of tea, but neither is the colour yellow, so they are welcome to each other.

Moreover, research conducted while putting this playlist together indicates that yellow is the least musically inspiring colour and there are really no good songs out there that feature it, aside from this one and “Itsy Bitsy Teeny Weeny Yellow Polka Dot Bikini”.

Green Grass” – Agathe & Fine

What do you mean I include Tom Waits in every playlist? He’s so well disguised here, I didn’t think you’d notice.

But since you did, I should tell you that Female Tribute to Tom Waits is an extraordinary three-volume collection of Tom Waits covers by women, full of startlingly beautiful, poignant and whimsical interpretations of his songs. There are big-names artists like Marianne Faithfull, Norah Jones and Holly Cole, but also many singers that I discovered here for the first time. There are covers in Spanish, impromptu live recordings, and charismatic French-accented voices. No other tribute collection I’ve heard reveals the depths of beauty lurking in the original songs quite as powerfully as this one.

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Playlist Friday: Describe your ideal woman

You: perfect, unattainable, batshit crazy.
Me:  in a band, lyrically gifted, aesthetically averse to vanilla.
Did I imagine it, or did you also feel that might make a fun playlist?

I have received complaints that the last playlist post had far too much writing in it. So you know what? No more writing after this paragraph. This is a no-justifications playlist. But – if you like it this way, leave a comment, so I’ll know.

Edited to add: I changed my mind so there will be more writing.

“Eurotrash Girl” – Cracker
This epic journey in search of the ideal woman resembles a one-man reenactment of the movie Eurotrip
“Short Skirt, Long Jacket” – Cake
Remember when Lucy Liu posed as an efficiency expert in a black leather business suit in Charlie’s Angels? That’s the girl Cake is looking for.
“Next Girl” – The Black Keys
This song’s greatness pales in comparison with the video for it. Watch it. There is a dinosaur puppet.
“Broken Heart” – Black Lab
These guys made a girl cry and now, apparently, she’s just perfect. Fucking rock stars.
“Atom Bomb” – Fluke
I’d like to date a well-equipped villain with a secret lair too, but a girl whose mind is set on world domination probably doesn’t have time for romance.
“Like a Friend” – Pulp
The “friend” strategy for getting the girl is rarely the right approach. This has been proven by expert stickfigures.

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Playlist Friday: For lovers of similes and metaphors

I can’t promise to do this every Friday, so some Fridays will be more special than others.

This Friday’s playlist was inspired by the lyrics of the Tom Waits song ”After You Die,” which are composed entirely of similes. Similes and metaphors, as you know, are the basic literary trope much abused by poets and songwriters of all ages. So it’s pretty impressive that some of them are still managing to cram songs full of really good ones.

“After You Die” – Tom Waits

What is it like after you die? Pretty surreal, according to this bonus track on Tom Waits’ latest album, Bad as Me. A few great suggestions as to what the afterlife may be like include “Like a rich guy clapping” and “Like a wild-ass painting.” At least that’s how I always heard this line – “a wild-ass painting,” as in “a painting that blows your mind.” But I just saw this written on a lyrics site as “a wild ass painting,” as in “an undomesticated donkey creating a piece of visual art.” I think this interpretation rift may turn into a breakaway religious movement one day.

Rain On the Midway - Single, Kevin Quain“Rain on the Midway” – Kevin Quain

A haunting love song from my favorite Toronto goth blues songwriter is a gripping answer to that age-old question once tackled in a Victorian sonnet – “How do I love thee? Let me count the ways”:
   I love you like tornadoes in spring,
   Like old guitar strings,
   Like Nina Simone sings…
Listen to it on iTunes and see if it doesn’t send shivers up your spine.

“Turn Me On” – Nina Simone

As for how Nina Simone sings – here she is, waiting to be turned on “like a light bulb in a dark room.” Gorgeous, heartbreaking song pleading for the return of a lover who left, which ends – appropriately enough – with a request for some fresh ice-cubes in her drink.

“Wild is the Wind” – David Bowie

It was Nina Simone’s cover of “Wild is the Wind” that inspired David Bowie to record his own version of this song. It compares the intensity of his love to the wildness of wind, which is as romantic as the wildness of the painting ass we encountered earlier is not. Incidentally, did you know David Bowie’s new album The Next Day is coming out in a couple of weeks and that he recently released a new wild-ass video for it, starring Tilda Swinton?

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